iwNHL 2017 Highlights

To view all videos from the event please click here

Clinical trials, pathologies and developments in personalized medicine

Philippe Gaulard, MD, PhD, from the Henri-Mondor Hospital, Paris, France, Francesco D’Amore, MD, PhD, from the Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, Richard Delarue, MD, from the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France, discuss topics such as recent developments in molecular pathology, results of recent clinical trials, and novel opportunities in personalized medicines in lymphoma at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

How are immunotherapies re-shaping the treatment of lymphoma

Catherine Bollard, MBChB, MD, FRACP, FRCPA from the Children’s National Health System and the George Washington University, Washington, D.C. chairs a lively discussion on the fast-evolving field of immunotherapy in lymphoma. Dr Bollard is joined by Stephan Ansell, MD, PhD from the Mayo Clinic, MN and Steve Gottschalk, MD from the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, together they review the immunotherapy session at the 2017 International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. It is an exciting time in lymphoma, with immunotherapies such as CAR T-cells and checkpoint inhibitors showing promising results. Discussing how these could be used in combination, the experts also consider the current challenges in this field.

The role of epigenetic modulators in the pathogenesis of lymphomas

Anas Younes, MD, from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY is joined by Eduardo Sotomayor, MD, from the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Washington, D.C, and Laura Pasqualucci, MD, from the Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. They discuss the results of large sequencing studies, and the role of epigenetic modulators in the pathogenesis of lymphomas.

Describing clonal evolution in lymphoma

Michael Pfreundschuh, MD from the Saarland University, Homburg, Germany is joined by Ryan Morin, PhD from the BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada, Reiner Siebert, MD from the Institute of Human Genetics, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany, and Robert Kridel, MD, MPH, PhD from the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada to discuss the clonal evolution in lymphoma. Acting as chair, Dr Pfreundschuh leads to panel to review the session’s highlights from the 2017 International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada, focusing on methods of understanding clonal evolution better. The take home message from this discussion is that it may be possible to not only describe clonal evolution but to understand the origin and cause of the initial transformation in patients.

iwNHL 2017 highlights: the PDX model

Marek Trneny, MD, from the Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, discusses highlights from the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada. The PDX model in particular is important in terms of drug discovery and testing, and better understanding the mechanism of the disease and drug action.

Combining targeted agents with checkpoint inhibitors in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Both targeted agents, such as brentuximab vedotin, and checkpoint inhibitors, such as pembrolizumab, have shown activity in a subset of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Francine Foss, MD at the Yale University, New Haven, CT is using this disease as a model to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of combining targeted agents with checkpoint inhibitors.

Recorded at the International Workshop of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017 meeting, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Targeting chemokines in lymphoma

Francine Foss, MD, from the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, discusses targeting chemokines at the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017 meeting, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Chemokines are a group of molecules that are expressed in the microenvironment of T- and B-cell malignancies. The anti-CCR4 antibody has been developed, and there is now research into whether there is a role for other chemokine therapy in lymphoma. There is also the possibility for targeting specific chemokines that affect the growth of the tumor cell to be targeted, as well as those associated with migration and metastasis.

Checkpoint inhibitors in Hodgkin lymphoma

There are two well-known checkpoint inhibitors that have shown efficacy in relapses/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, both PD-1 inhibitors. Here, John Kuruvilla, MD, FRCPC at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON takes us through the existing data, such as efficacy, safety and remission rates. Recorded at the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017 meeting, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

CC122: a new IMiD in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

John Kuruvilla, MD, FRCPC, from the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, discusses the development of IMiDs at the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada. IMiDs have been shown to have single agent activity, particularly in lymphoma and myeloma. A novel compound being developed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is called CC122, shown to be well tolerated, and its administered as orally. It has also been tested in combination with a BTK inhibitor, an MTOR inhibitor, and with anti CD20 antibodies in the relapsed refractory setting. These will hopefully be put through Phase III testing in the near future.

What are the challenges of integrating therapy around autologous transplantation?

John Kuruvilla, MD, FRCPC, from the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, discusses integrating treatments around autologous transplantation at the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Phase III trials have shown that autologous transplantation is superior to conventional chemotherapy, however, more research needs to be carried out to determine how to integrate novel therapies around transplant, because a large proportion of patients don’t respond to treatment before transplant. This has been successful in Hodgkin lymphoma so far, however, this has not been mirrored in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. CAR T-cell therapy has been shown to have promising results for patients who are ineligible for, or had relapsed, after transplant.

Determining the optimal use of targeted therapies in mantle cell lymphoma

With the the rise of novel targeted therapies, it has become increasingly important to optimize treatment sequence and treatment combinations. Michael Williams, MD and his group at the Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center, Charlottesville, VA have been focusing on developing an optimal strategy to use novel targeted therapies such as Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors and Bcl-2 inhibitors, among others, as front-line therapy (either in combination or as chemotherapy replacements). Here, he discusses some of the challenges his team has faced. Recorded at the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017, held in Vancouver, BC.

Overcoming toxicities when combining PI3K inhibitors with other treatments

Idelalisib was the first phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor to be used in lymphoma, which had remarkable responses on B-cell lymphomas as a single-agent. Nathan Fowler, MD from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX talks about the different combination studies with idelalisib, and how we are trying to overcome toxicities found, by developing second-generation PI3K inhibitors, such as copanlisib, umbralisib, and duvelisib. Recorded at the International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) 2017 annual meeting, held in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Side effects of novel PI3K inhibitors

Nathan Fowler, MD, from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, discusses side effects of PI3K inhibitors at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Transaminitis is where transaminases are elevated in the liver. This usually occurs at the start of treatment, and has been found to go away once stopping and restarting treatment. Other side effects include inflammatory conditions, such as colitis and pneumonitis. It is recommended that patients who present with these side effects stop treatment, and undergo an infectious workup.

Exciting advances in checkpoint inhibitors CAR T-cells, and ALK inhibitors

Steven T. Rosen, MD, from the City of Hope, Duarte, CA, discusses highlights of the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. More concrete data had been released for various novel treatments, such as checkpoint inhibitors, CAR T-cell therapies, and ALK inhibitors. Dr Rosen explains that this is a promising and rapidly evolving field, but there are still many challenges ahead.

BTK inhibitors: toxicity, resistance, and combinations

Steven T. Rosen, MD, from the City of Hope, Duarte, CA, discusses recent developments in BTK inhibitors at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. BTK inhibitors have been shown to be effective in CLL, mantle cell lymphoma, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, and MALT lymphomas, and are constantly being developed to reduce toxicity. More is also being learned about their resistance mechanisms, and the benefit of combinations.

The evolution of CAR T-cell therapy

Steven T. Rosen, MD, from the City of Hope, Duarte, CA, discusses the evolution of CAR T-cell therapy at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. CAR T-cells have so far shown very promising results, even in relapsed and refractory settings. This therapy is still in its infancy, and therefore there will be continuous improvement in terms of the toxicity profile, and how it is administered. Initially, it has been carried out in specialist centres, however, there is hope that it will evolve into a more common and widespread treatment.

Repurposed HIV and arthritis drugs in the treatment of leukaemia

Steven T. Rosen, MD, from the City of Hope, Duarte, CA, discusses novel conceptual treatment approaches at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. A novel nucleoside analogue is being developed that targets RNA instead of DNA has shown promising results in the treatment of AML. Drugs are also being repurposed, for example, arthritis drug leflunomide is being trialled in myeloma, and ritonavir, an HIV drug, is being tested to alter the metabolic activity of leukaemia cells.

Making cancer treatments more affordable

Steven T. Rosen, MD, from the City of Hope, Duarte, CA, discusses the affordability of cancer treatments at the 2017 International Workshop in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iwNHL) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. There are various novel agents being developed, however, current costs make some treatments unaffordable. Therefore, there needs to be negotiations with pharmaceutical companies to bring down the costs, and improve the availability of treatments.

16th International Workshop on Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Nice, France

Sep

21–23

2018 Meeting

Location

Hotel Le Meridien
1 Prom. des Anglais, 06046 Nice, France

© 2014 - 2019 World Health Communications Ltd